22 January 2019

True costs of online mapping?

In a piece on The Medium, Jason Voiovich asks whether the utility of Google Maps is worth the hidden costs. Google long ago moved past being a search company and is now an information broker. But his reminder of how much of that information we provide was a good read at the start of the semester.





09 January 2019

The power of where?

Shimonti Paul writes in "Maps define ‘The Power of Where’" about myriad ways that GIS and maps are serving people, ranging from basic public uses to advanced applications for emergencies. You can use a red flag to mark the spot where they call it utopian, but the piece has some nice quotes that make it worth a read.


04 January 2019

Use at your own risk?

National Parks have always been a little dangerous. That is part of their appeal. But, while the park rangers are furloughed, some people are still using National Parks. And, explains the Washington Post, for at least three different visitors it has turned deadly.


“A casual cross country skier would want to go to Tower Falls” in Yellowstone, Wenk said. “If they suffer a heart attack — every year you have that — we wouldn’t be able to quickly respond. You might be dramatically delayed. It’s correct, people die in national parks all the time. If you can attribute [the shutdown] to people not being able to get to them for an hour and a half, that’s another story.”

31 December 2018

The intersection of art and the Lower Raritan

TaeHo Lee has posted a great interview with artist, Olga Bautista. Her work exploring natural materials and trash, will be displayed later in January at Kim's Bike Shop. I am looking forward to seeing the work because it sounds like she has found a way to connect personal or intimate interactions with plants and streams, with larger expressions about the forces nature.


The opening reception for Windows of Understanding is at the Zimmerli Art Museum on January 22nd. Olga’s art installation will be exhibited at Kim’s Bike Shop, 111 French St., starting on January 21st. From 10-noon on January 21 the Olga and the LRWP will participate in walking tours of the art installations and seed plantings at 10am and 2pm.

03 December 2018

Free Webinar

WEBINAR #4: Co-designing sustainable land systems with spatial analysis and mapping tools


TOMORROW! Tuesday, 4 December, 2018 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM EST 
Attendance is free!
The GLP working group on co-production is pleased to invite you to the fourth webinar of the webinar series on co-production in the field of land-system science.

The webinar is open to people already engaged in co-production, as well as to newcomers to the topic, who are not currently engaged in this exciting work. The webinar will focus on co-designing sustainable land systems with spatial analysis and mapping tools.
Description
Land systems are inherently spatial. This means that participatory land use planning and management involve negotiation and decision-making processes on issues such as the location of things, activities, and responsibilities, or the connections and complementarities of functions among different areas. Therefore, tools that help visualising past and current, or modelling future states, extents, and interactions of spatial elements, can play a crucial role for the co-production of sustainable land systems.

Speakers
The three speakers will provide examples on how various types of mapping and spatial analysis tools can be used in participatory processes:
Joan Bastide (Senior Research Scientist, Centre for Development and Environment (CDE), University of Bern, Switzerland. Coordinator of OneMap Myanmar project): In Myanmar, the allocation of land to large-scale palm oil plantations have generated severe conflicts between local communities, government, private companies and ethnic armed groups. In order to address the complex land disputes, stakeholders are now collaborating towards the co-production of land use assessment data and tools by mobilising drones, interactive web mapping, participatory data collection and validation, and multi-stakeholder dialogue platforms. Based on this process, unused land will be redistributed to landless communities and internally displaced populations.
Michael Uwemedimo (Project Director, CMAP, Nigeria). Michael’s project endeavours to give excluded communities in Port Harcourt (Nigeria) the power to put themselves on the map, to identify and analyse key problems and potentials, in view of giving focus to future planning interventions. Youth-led participatory mapping teams are leading the citywide data collection component. Their efforts have ensured that informal settlements across the city are now included in the most ambitious water and sanitation infrastructure project in Nigeria. In his presentation, Michael, will provide insights into this project, which will form the foundation of an inclusive City Development Strategy.
Giacomo Rambaldi (Senior Programme Coordinator, Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation, Netherlands). For the past 20 years, Giacomo has been animating a large community of practitioners engaged in the conduct of participatory mapping, later on dubbed as participatory GIS (PGIS). He will illustrate the diversity of PGIS practices with practical examples and then focus on the use of participatory 3D modelling and on case studies in the Pacific region where the participatory process and follow-up actions have led to profound positive change.
You can also view recordings of the first three webinars and download supplementary materials on the working group's homepage.

Registration Information
Registration is open to 1,000 people, but attendance is limited to the first 100 participants who join the meeting the day of the event, regardless of registration order. 
If you would like to receive copies of all presentations as well as a meeting recording link please register for the event even if you cannot attend.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.