04 April 2008

Suitability Analysis Notes

So, when some of you asked for a little more on suitability analysis, I'll admit that I didn't know what I was going to find. After some digging, I found an incredible treat. I found the old handwritten Suitability Analysis notes from when Steve Strom used these techniques in his studio. This four page set of Suitability Analysis notes is online now as a PDF. His description of weighted analysis lacks a graphic, so I created a digital version of both some of his graphics and a new Weight and Rate graphic that should help you work through it all as you look ahead to Monday's exam:To be clear, each grid shows the very same piece of land but being rated for a different issue (soils, slope, vegetation). Presumably that is fairly objective. But each individual criterion is then weighted based on relative importance. In this case, Slope has rather subjectively been weighted as 5 times more important that Vegetation. If you click on my graphic it will enlarge and be more readable.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Thanks for sharing the notes. It'd be nice to get some of this up on wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suitability_analysis

Charlotte said...

Thank you for sharing this tidbit of information on suitability analysis and a weight and rate problem.

Just to make sure I am understanding this correctly, if we were asked where the best location for suitability would be, it would be the cell(s) where the numerical value produced is the lowest?

So in the graphic, it would be the cells that have the value 4 in additive overlay? And in the weight and rate image it would be the cell with the value of 10?

With that being said, if the lowest value is where the best suitability would be then would the rate and weight method be a more accurate tool for finding suitability over the addictive overlay since the weight and rate produced only one cell as apposed to three cells in the addictive?

Charlotte said...

Thanks for sharing this tidbit of information on suitability analysis with a weight and rate problem.

Just to make sure I am understanding it correctly, if we were asked where the best location for suitability would be, it would be the cell(s) where the value produced is the lowest?

So in the graphic produced, it would be either the cells where the value is 4 in the additive overlay or where the value of the cell is 10 in the weight and rate?

With that being said (and if it is correct), would that make it so the weight and rate method of finding suitability is more accurate because only one cell is produced with the lowest value and therefore it would represent the very best location for suitability?

Anonymous said...

thanks this made it more clear